How to use a picking trolley with steps

Picking trolleys with steps are a simple and efficient way of picking high-stored items.

An efficient warehouse maximises the use of space, and shelving systems can use the whole height of a building to store as many items as possible. Even if there is plenty of room to store current stock levels, future expansions of the business need to be planned for.

Forklifts can easily store palette items on high shelves, but when it comes to picking orders, employees need to be able to pick individual items stored at all heights. If a worker frequently stretches up to reach high stored items, this can put a strain on the body that causes muscle injuries, and could lead to unsafe manual handling techniques.

Steps are an easy way to reach high-stored goods, but pickers do not want the added burden of carrying steps around with them, so a picking trolley with steps is the perfect solution. Steps attached to the trolleys move with it and are available at any time for pickers to reach high items. The steps need to have rails either side for safety.

Picking tables with steps should be made from tubular steel as this is both lightweight and strong.
The trolley manufacture will specify the maximum weight the trolley can hold, and obviously the steps need to be strong enough to support heavy people.

Trolleys must have swivel casters with efficient brakes so that there is no danger of the trolley moving when someone is on the steps. A trolley with a top and bottom shelf will be able to carry a high number of items.

Picking trolleys with steps are extremely safe as long as all people operating them are trained in their use and know the correct way of loading and unloading items. The maximum weight of items carried up or down the steps needs to be specified.

Posted by Katrina
8th May 2019
Health & Safety

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